Lecture Series 2017/18


Global Deals: What are they? Do we need a new one? Can the G20 lay the groundwork?

Speaker:
Professor Anthony J. Payne, Professor of Politics and Director of the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI), University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
Date: Wednesday, 25 April 2018
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract
This lecture addresses one of the broadest but yet most important issues in contemporary global politics, namely, how is globalisation to be governed. It will introduce the concept of a ‘Global Deal’ and ask what it means to say that one has been made. Such deals will be treated as if they are rare and occasional phenomena. The lecture will then consider some historical case-studies: the Bretton Woods arrangements of 1944-5 as an example of a successful deal and the so-called Third World’s attempt to negotiate a ‘New International Economic Order’ in the 1970s as an example of an unsuccessful would-be deal. It will ask too whether world orders can be enforced, as opposed to negotiated, and will consider the neoliberal era from that perspective. In its second half the lecture will turn to the contemporary era and ask if a new ‘Global Deal’ needs to be negotiated to address rising inequalities, forge a post-neoliberal consensus and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. If so, what sort of a deal does it need to be? Who can lead in its making? Is the G20, for all its faults and weaknesses, best placed to shape such a negotiation, or has it missed its historic opportunity? What are the obstacles in the way of such a deal? Indeed, is the very idea of such a deal irredeemably utopian, or is it something that we should actually be seeking to design and that could possibly be made by the right politics? By this stage the lecture will be asking lots of big questions, but may not be providing so many answers!

Registration:
https://goo.gl/QKrLEb

Changing the Course of Chinese History: The Paradoxical Legacy of the Cultural Revolution

Speaker:
Professor Andrew G. Walder, Denise O’Leary and Kent Thiry Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Senior Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, USA
Date: Thursday, 22 March 2018
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract
The “ten years of turmoil” at the end of the Mao era laid political foundations for a successful transition to a market-oriented economy, while also creating circumstances that helped ensure the cohesion and survival of China’s party-state. This was not the intention of those who launched it, but it created circumstances that favored a successful move to a new course. It weakened the bureaucracy and vested interests in the old system; it caused economic stagnation and extensive damage to China’s scientific and technological capacities; it left a pragmatic senior leader in a prominent position; and the opening to the West in the early 1970s later led to development aid. The paradoxical impact of the Cultural Revolution becomes especially clear when contrasted with the Soviet Union in the 1980s, where political and economic circumstances were starkly different, and where Gorbachev’s attempts to implement similar changes in the face of entrenched bureaucratic interests led to the collapse and dismemberment of the Soviet state.

Registration:
https://goo.gl/Vqbgwy

How political religion shapes today’s global politics


Speaker:
Dr Alexander Görlach, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, New York
Date: Tuesday, 14 November 2017
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Bio-sketch
Alexander Görlach is an In Defense of Democracy Affiliate Professor to Harvard University College and a fellow at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Cambridge, UK. Alex is also a senior advisor to the Berggruen Institute, a think tank based in Los Angeles. He is the publisher of the online-magazine www.saveliberaldemocracy.com and an op-ed contributor to the New York Times.

Abstract
In all parts of the world the resurgence of national narratives, fueled by religious rhetoric and claims, is to be observed: Russian-Orthodoxy in Vladimir Putin’s realm, Sunni-Islam in Turkey, Hindu-Nationalism in India, and Confucianism in China. Also in Europe and the United States, strongholds of liberal democracies, narratives have been deployed that highlight the identity of countries in regard to their political-religious heritage. The lecture will look into the whereabouts of these developments and tries to make a case for a secular, pluralist approach that has been, for the last seventy years, the prevalent model for society in all parts of the Western World.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9ELF8fH9PJPm7yt

Global Yijing: The Receptions of the Book of Changes in Europe and the US


Speaker:
Dr Geoffrey Redmond, MA, MD, New York City
Professor Tze-ki Hon, Professor, Department of Chinese and History, City University of Hong Kong
Date: Wednesday, 1 November 2017
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract
This presentation will briefly review the history of the Yijing within its own culture, then trace its arrival and later history in the West. The early translations into Western languages (Latin, German, English and French) typically misunderstood the nature of the text. Particularly with the appearance of the Wilhelm- Baynes translation and the renewed interest in Asian thought beginning in the sixties, the Yijing became a world classic. Two trends developed: First, the Yijing (usually spelled as I Ching and pronounced ‘eye ching’) was adopted into popular culture and inspired many works derivative of it. Second, a few serious Western scholars began to make important contributions to Yi Xue 易學 (Study of the Changes), continuing the project of the Doubting Antiquity movement (Yigupai 疑古派) to reconstruct the meanings of the Zhouyi 周易, the 3,000 year-old earliest textual layer. Both trends will be discussed and divination practice will be demonstrated.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6X5DWK1Fq1NdM1f?Q_CHL=qr