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Dr. CHAN Kit Ying (Vivien) (陳潔盈博士)

B. Soc. Sc. (CUHK), M. A.(U. of Kansas), PhD(U. of Kansas)

Assistant Professor

Contact Information

Office: Y7419 AC1
Phone: 34427073
Fax: 34420283
Email: vivien.chanky@cityu.edu.hk

Research Interests

  • Speech Perception and Production
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Foreign-accented Speech Processing
  • Second Language Acquisition
I obtained my Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kansas in 2012. After that I worked as an Assistant Professor at James Madision University in USA. I joined the Department of Applied Social Studies at City University of Hong Kong in Aug 2016. I am specialized in Cognitive Psychology.


Previous Experience

  • Aug 2012 - Aug 2016, Assistant Professor, James Madison University.


Publication Show All Publications Show Prominent Publications


Journal

  • Chan, K. Y. , Hall, H. D. & Assgari, A. (2016). The role of vowel formant frequencies and duration in the perception of foreign accent. Journal of Cognitive Psychology: the Voice, Speech, and Language. 1 - 12. doi:10.1080/20445911.2016.1170746
  • Chan, K. Y. & Vitevitch, M. S. (2015). The influence of neighborhood density on the recognition of Spanish-accented words. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance. 41. 69 - 85.
  • Vitevitch, M. S. , Chan, K. Y. & Goldstein, R. (2014). Insights into failed lexical retrieval from network science. Cognitive Psychology. 68. 1 - 32.
  • Vitevitch, M. S. , Chan, K. Y. & Roodenrys, S. (2012). Complex network structure influences processing in long-term and short-term memory. Journal of Memory and Language. 67. 30 - 44.
  • Chan, K. Y. & Vitevitch, M. S. (2010). Network structure influences speech production. Cognitive Science. 34. 685 - 697.
  • Chan, K. Y. & Vitevitch, M. S. (2009). The influence of the phonological neighborhood clustering-coefficient on spoken word recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance. 35. 1934 - 1949.

Book Chapter

  • Vitevitch, M. S. , Chan, K. Y. & Goldstein, R. (2014). Using English as a “model language” to understand language processing. Motor speech disorders: a cross- language perspective. Bristol, Buffalo, Toronto. Multilingual Matters Ltd.


Last update date : 08 Sep 2016