Seminars

Colloquium: Environmental Challenges and Opportunities in Hong Kong

Mr. Elvis AU, JP

Mr. Elvis AU, JP

Deputy Director,
Environmental Protection Department, HKSAR

Date: 19 September 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: P4-703, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The talk will give an overview of the major environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and the opportunities such challenges open up.  It will also cover the newly established Environmental Academy in the Environmental Protection Department and how this may contribute to advancing environmental professionalism in Hong Kong and the Greater Bay Area.

About the Speaker

Mr. Elvis AU is the Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Department of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government. He has a BSc degree in Civil Engineering (major in environmental engineering) and a MSc degree in urban planning with Distinction from University of Hong Kong as well as Master of Science (Finance) with Merit from University of London in 2009. He served as the President and Immediate Past President of International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) from 2001 to 2003. He was the chairman of the Environmental Division of Hong Kong Institution of Engineers from 2016 to 2017 and was the Vice Chairman of the Hong Kong Institute of Qualified Environmental Professionals from 2016 to 2018. He has published many articles in international professional books and journals. He has worked in a wide range of environmental areas including environmental policy and environmental legislation including the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Ordinance, strategic planning, EIA and strategic environmental assessment, noise policy matters, cross-boundary environmental cooperation, corporate environmental management, sustainable development, building energy legislation and policy, water quality and sewerage, nature conservation policy and the first Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan for Hong Kong, waste management and facility planning including the first ever organic waste treatment facility and the integrated waste management facility.  Since 2017, he has been in charge of environmental enforcement, environmental assessment and noise, water quality and sewerage and EPD’s headquarter functions.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Environmental Challenges and Opportunities in HK” or the activity code “E2-2018-1593”.

Remarks

Effective from Semester A, 2018-19, all SEE undergraduate students applying for student exchange, summer programme, internship arranged by SEE, scholarships and other SEE learning activities must have attended at least 3 activities under "SEE Career Aspiration and Development Programme" and/or "SEE Colloquium" since the previous semester. For Year-1 students (Cohort 2018) and other students who have just commenced their study with SEE, it is not a must for them to have a minimum of 3 times of attendance at the time of application for the aforementioned learning opportunities in Semester A, 2018-19. Yet, they should start participating in the activities and be prepared to meet the aforementioned new application requirement from Semester B, 2018-19 onwards.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Impacts of Advanced 3D Electron Microscopy Techniques for Structure Characterization of Porous Materials

Prof. Xiaodong ZOU

Prof. Xiaodong ZOU

Professor and Deputy Head,
Berzelii Center EXSELENT on Porous Materials,
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry,
Stockholm University, Sweden

Date: 20 September 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Venue: Room 5-205, 5/F, Lau Ming Wai Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Porous materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a wide range of applications in for example catalysis, gas storage and separation, drug delivery. This is because these materials have uniform pore sizes, large surface areas, and adjustable chemical functionality. In order to understand the functions of these materials and develop new porous materials, it is essential to know their atomic structures. However, many zeolites and MOFs are synthesized as poly-crystallites, which are too small for structure determination by X-ray diffraction. They can, however, be studied by transmission electron microscopy. In this talk, I will present several advanced 3D electron microscopy techniques and their applications for structure characterization of novel zeolites and MOFs. I will show that the structure information can be used for prediction of new structures, and demonstrate the use of electron tomography for studying the hierarchical structures. Finally I will show our latest development of electron diffraction techniques towards automated data collection, in order to make electron diffraction as feasible and accurate as X-ray diffraction for phase analysis and structure determination.

About the Speaker

Xiaodong ZOU is a full professor and deputy head of the Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University. She received her B.Sc. in Physics at Peking University in 1984, and Ph.D. in structural chemistry at Stockholm University in 1995. She joined the faculty at Stockholm University in 1996 and became professor 2005. Xiaodong ZOU has made important contributions in the development of electron crystallographic methods. Her group has developed several image and diffraction-based methods and software for accurate atomic structure determination of unknown crystals, and solved a large number of complex structures, especially porous materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks. She has also been working on design, synthesis and applications of novel porous materials. In 2006, she received 100 MSEK from VR and VINNOVA to build up the Berzelii Center EXSELENT on Porous Materials and was the director 2006-2012. She is a ccouncil member of the International Zeolite Association and a member of the Structure Commission of International Zeolite Association. She has co-authored over 270 peer-reviewed publications, and given more than 170 invited talks. She received several prestigious awards given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and is an academician of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA), a fellow of Royal Chemistry Society, UK.

Personal website:  https://www.mmk.su.se/zou

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

High-resolution impacts of traffic on air pollution

Dr. Marc Stettler

Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Imperial College London

Date: 21 September 2018 (Friday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Venue: G4701, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Most cities suffer from elevated concentrations of pollution as a result of road traffic exhaust emissions. Our picture of personal exposure is improving and measurements indicate that exposure to ambient air pollution in cities is highly variable in time and space. This talk will discuss methods to estimate vehicle emissions using real-world emissions data and machine learning approaches. Secondly, the talk will describe recent research comparing the results from two air quality models. The large-eddy simulation (LES) model DALES-Urban is used to evaluate the predictive skill of the operational air quality model SIRANE. The use of LES in this study presents a novel approach to air quality model evaluation, avoiding the uncertainty associated with field and experimental validations and providing numerical control that permits systematic analysis of targeted parametrisations and assumptions. A case study is conducted over South Kensington, London under steady-state, neutral conditions, simulating the dispersion of both inert (NOx) and reactive (NO, NO2 and O3) pollutants. SIRANE is shown to successfully capture the dominant trends with respect to canyon-averaged concentrations and along-canyon velocities. The prediction of along-canyon velocities is shown to exhibit sources of systematic error dependant on the angle of incidence of the mean wind. The validity of the uniform in-canyon concentration is assessed by analysing the pedestrian, leeward and windward concentrations resolved in DALES-Urban. Vertical variations in concentrations within the urban canopy are shown to be more significant than directional asymmetry, particularly for primary pollutants. A correction factor of ~1.66 is proposed in order to avoid significant underestimations of pedestrian level exposure. The prevalence of intersections and advective nature of the shear layer are highlighted as important differences between modelling real heterogeneous urban topology and idealised infinite canyons.

About the Speaker

Dr Marc Stettler is a Senior Lecturer in Transport and the Environment in the Centre for Transport Studies and Director of the Transport & Environment Laboratory at Imperial College London. Marc's research aims to quantify and reduce environmental impacts from transport using a range of emissions measurement and modelling tools. Examples of recent research projects include: quantifying real-world vehicle emissions; using real-world vehicle emissions data to improve emissions models; evaluating economic and environmental benefits of Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems (KERS) for road freight; quantifying aircraft emissions at airports; and improving global estimates of aviation black carbon emissions and their impacts. Prior to joining Imperial, Marc was a Research Associate in the Centre for Sustainable Road Freight and Energy Efficient Cities Initiative at the University of Cambridge, where he also completed his PhD.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Secular decrease of wind power potential in India associated with warming Indian Ocean

Dr. Meng Gao

Postdoctoral Fellow
Harvard University

Date: 26 September 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The Indian government has set an ambitious target for future renewable power generation, including 60GW of cumulative wind power capacity by 2022. The benefits of such significant investments are vulnerable however to changing climate. Based on hourly wind data from an assimilated meteorology reanalysis dataset covering 1980-2016, we show that wind power potential may have declined secularly over this interval, particularly in western India. Surface temperature data confirm that significant warming occurred in the Indian Ocean over the study period, leading to modulation of high pressure over the ocean. A multivariable linear regression model incorporating the pressure gradient between the Indian Ocean and the Indian subcontinent can account for the inter-annual variability of wind power. A series of numerical sensitivity experiments confirms that warming in the Indian Ocean contributes to subsidence and dampening of upward motion over the Indian continent, resulting potentially in weakening of the monsoonal circulation and wind speeds over India.

About the Speaker

The Indian government has set an ambitious target for future renewable power generation, including 60GW of cumulative wind power capacity by 2022. The benefits of such significant investments are vulnerable however to changing climate. Based on hourly wind data from an assimilated meteorology reanalysis dataset covering 1980-2016, we show that wind power potential may have declined secularly over this interval, particularly in western India. Surface temperature data confirm that significant warming occurred in the Indian Ocean over the study period, leading to modulation of high pressure over the ocean. A multivariable linear regression model incorporating the pressure gradient between the Indian Ocean and the Indian subcontinent can account for the inter-annual variability of wind power. A series of numerical sensitivity experiments confirms that warming in the Indian Ocean contributes to subsidence and dampening of upward motion over the Indian continent, resulting potentially in weakening of the monsoonal circulation and wind speeds over India.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

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